The First Collective Security Agreement The United States Entered Into Was The

Morgenthau (1948) notes that three conditions of collective security must be met in order to succeed in war: collective defence is an agreement normally formalized by a treaty and an organization, between participating states that oblige a member state to be defended when it is attacked by another state outside the organization. NATO is the best-known organization of collective defence; its famous Article 5 invites Member States (but does not fully oblige them) to help another member who has been attacked. This article was only used after the September 11 attacks on the United States, after which other NATO members aided the U.S. war on terror by participating in the war in Afghanistan. At the same time, the world government`s approach is a matter of centralization. Collective defence agreements within NATO have served to place all of Western Europe under the US “nuclear umbrella”. In the 1950s, one of NATO`s first military doctrines emerged in the form of “massive retaliation” or the idea that if a member were attacked, the United States would respond with a large-scale nuclear attack. . . .